Category: weddingvenue

Larnach Castle

Larnach Castle is located on the ridge of the Otago Peninsula in Dunedin, New Zealand. Entrepreneur and politician, William Larnach, built the Gothic Revival castle in 1871. After William’s death, the following legal battles over his will had the Larnach family selling the home in 1906. During the 20thcentury, the property changed hands numerous times and underwent updates, but by 1967 the castle was in poor condition. The castle had been used as an insane asylum, a hospital for shell-shocked soldiers, and a nuns’ retreat. The castle was then purchased by the Barker family, who restored the castle, added the award-winning gardens, and retrieved some of the original period furnishings for the home. The forty-three-room castle boasts exposed verandahs, a 3,000 square foot ballroom, and intricately carved ceilings, which took years to complete. The castle sits on 35 acres, which includes a variety of gardens, a stable with six guest rooms, and a lodge that has twelve themed rooms. Larnach Castle serves as a tourist attraction and is open to the public for tours, events, and weddings. The castle offers a gift shop, a café, and beautiful tower views.

Vincigliata Castle

Vincigliata Castle is located near the town of Fiesole in Florence, Italy. In 1031 AD, the medieval castle served as a stronghold for the Vinsdomini family. The castle passed to Alessandri I who owned the castle for three hundred years. In the 17thcentury, the castle was sold and eventually fell into ruin. In 1840, Englishman John Temple purchased the castle and restored it in the neo-Gothic style, which took over 15 years to complete. He also purchased 700 hundred acres of land surrounding the castle and began restoring the houses and villas. He planted a grand English garden on the castle grounds, planted cypress tress in the rocky areas, and added a fountain, a vineyard, and statues to the property. During WWII, the castle was requisitioned by the Italian government and used as a POW camp, which ended with the Italian Armistice of 1943. In 2012, the castle was opened as a venue for special events. Vincigliata Castle has a long history and is known for the tragic love story of two lovers torn apart by political feuds between two noble families, much like Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” except their names were Bianca degli Usimbardi and Uberto del Mazzecca. In the 13thcentury, Bianca was forbidden by her father from leaving the castle to meet Uberto. When her father is called to war and wounded, he ends up being saved by the knight Uberto. Upon being nursed back to health by Uberto, Giovanni gave permission for the two to wed. Sadly as Uberto approached upon horseback to the wedding ceremony, he was attacked by unhappy family members of Bianca’s and murdered. This action continued the hatred between the two noble families. Legend claims that after Bianca witnessed her love’s death, she eventually died of a broken heart. 

Vincigliata Castle

Vincigliata Castle is located near the town of Fiesole in Florence, Italy. In 1031 AD, the medieval castle served as a stronghold for the Vinsdomini family. The castle passed to Alessandri I who owned the castle for three hundred years. In the 17thcentury, the castle was sold and eventually fell into ruin. In 1840, Englishman John Temple purchased the castle and restored it in the neo-Gothic style, which took over 15 years to complete. He also purchased 700 hundred acres of land surrounding the castle and began restoring the houses and villas. He planted a grand English garden on the castle grounds, planted cypress tress in the rocky areas, and added a fountain, a vineyard, and statues to the property. During WWII, the castle was requisitioned by the Italian government and used as a POW camp, which ended with the Italian Armistice of 1943. In 2012, the castle was opened as a venue for special events. Vincigliata Castle has a long history and is known for the tragic love story of two lovers torn apart by political feuds between two noble families, much like Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” except their names were Bianca degli Usimbardi and Uberto del Mazzecca. In the 13thcentury, Bianca was forbidden by her father from leaving the castle to meet Uberto. When her father is called to war and wounded, he ends up being saved by the knight Uberto. Upon being nursed back to health by Uberto, Giovanni gave permission for the two to wed. Sadly as Uberto approached upon horseback to the wedding ceremony, he was attacked by unhappy family members of Bianca’s and murdered. This action continued the hatred between the two noble families. Legend claims that after Bianca witnessed her love’s death, she eventually died of a broken heart. 

Hammond Castle

Hammond Castle is located in Gloucester, Massachusetts in the United States. The medieval castle was built between 1926-1929 as a residence for scientist and inventor, John Hays Hammond, Jr. Mr. Hammond pioneered the study of remote control and held over 400 patents. He was known as the “Father of Radio Control” and was a protégé of Alexander Graham Bell and Thomas Edison. The castle was custom built to house Hammond’s collection of artifacts, which date from ancient Rome through the Renaissance period. Hammond Castle sits high upon a bluff and boasts views of the Atlantic shoreline. The castle’s exterior is built from granite; the windows, doorways, and much of the interior structure are pieces taken from European castles and buildings that Hammond had shipped to the U.S. The castle has a covered courtyard, a drawbridge, an indoor pool, several towers, a Great Hall, secret passageways, rooms with hidden doors, a library, a laboratory, a gift shop, and a gigantic pipe organ that was considered the largest residential organ in the hemisphere, unfortunately the organ stopped functioning in 2015. One of Hammond’s prized possessions is a human skull said to be from one of Christopher Columbus’ crewmembers. Hammond passed away in 1965 and left the castle to the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston. Due to high maintenance costs, the Archdiocese sold the castle for $68,000 to organist Virgil Fox who eventually sold the property. Hammond Castle serves as a museum and is open to the public from May to September. 

Hammond Castle

Hammond Castle is located in Gloucester, Massachusetts in the United States. The medieval castle was built between 1926-1929 as a residence for scientist and inventor, John Hays Hammond, Jr. Mr. Hammond pioneered the study of remote control and held over 400 patents. He was known as the “Father of Radio Control” and was a protégé of Alexander Graham Bell and Thomas Edison. The castle was custom built to house Hammond’s collection of artifacts, which date from ancient Rome through the Renaissance period. Hammond Castle sits high upon a bluff and boasts views of the Atlantic shoreline. The castle’s exterior is built from granite; the windows, doorways, and much of the interior structure are pieces taken from European castles and buildings that Hammond had shipped to the U.S. The castle has a covered courtyard, a drawbridge, an indoor pool, several towers, a Great Hall, secret passageways, rooms with hidden doors, a library, a laboratory, a gift shop, and a gigantic pipe organ that was considered the largest residential organ in the hemisphere, unfortunately the organ stopped functioning in 2015. One of Hammond’s prized possessions is a human skull said to be from one of Christopher Columbus’ crewmembers. Hammond passed away in 1965 and left the castle to the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston. Due to high maintenance costs, the Archdiocese sold the castle for $68,000 to organist Virgil Fox who eventually sold the property. Hammond Castle serves as a museum and is open to the public from May to September. 

Cluny Castle

Cluny Castle is located in Aberdeenshire, Scotland. The castle was built in 1604 in a Z-plan design, which has a rectangular tower and smaller towers attached at opposite corners. It was Sir Thomas Gordon’s son, John Gordon who built the castle to replace an earlier house. By 1636, debt and reconstruction caused a financial burden and creditors mostly held the property until 1680, when it became the property of Robert Gordon. Cluny Castle passed between various branches of the Gordon family for close to 400 years. The castle served as a shelter against the Jacobite rebels in the 18thcentury. Colonel Gordon further extended the castle with several additions around 1820. This work took several years as the old castle was covered in granite to blend in with the new extensions. The estate went into a trust since Colonel Gordon had no heirs. Two wings of the castle and the adjoining chapel were destroyed by fire in 1926, but were restored. After the death of the colonel’s wife, the estate was passed to his cousin, Charles Arthur Linzee, who adopted the name Linzee Gordon to comply with the codicil on Colonel Gordon’s will. As of 2016, the castle has been privately owned by the Baron of Cluny, Cosmo Linzee Gordon, who did extensive renovations to the castle. Cluny Castle has circular towers, arched windows, and crenellated parapets all nestled in acres of parkland down a tree-lined drive. Cluny Castle is not open to the public, but it is available for corporate events and weddings in the chapel. #Castles #ClunyCastle #Scotland #Aberdeenshire #WeddingVenue #CastleWeddings

Castello Di Rivalta

Castello Di Rivalta is located in Rivalta in the Province of Piacenza, Italy. The Village of Rivalta is a fortified complex. The fortified castle overlooks the banks of the river Trebbia. The castle is first mentioned in a purchase in 1025 A.D. In 1048, Emperor Henry II donated the castle to the monastery of San Savino di Piacenza. Throughout the centuries the castle was at the center of many battles, sieges, and treason. The castle switched hands numerous times throughout its history, but in the 14thcentury the land was ceded to the Obizzo Landi family. The Landi family reconstructed the castle into the residence it is today. The decedents of the 14thcentury feudal family still live in the castle. The castle is designed in a quadrangular that houses more than 50 rooms. The internal arcaded courtyard is decorated with marble columns, there’s also a cylindrical tower, a dungeon, a music room, a gallery, a billiards room, and a weapons room. In the 18thcentury more trees were planted to surround the castle’s English style gardens, the façade and some of the rooms were renovated at this time. The Castle serves as a Museum of Military Costume and has a Spa and Wellness center. Castello Di Rivalta is open to the public from February to November.

Tullibole Castle

Tullibole Castle is located in the village of Crook of Devon in Perthshire County, Scotland. John Halliday built the 17thcentury castle upon the land of a 14thcentury building site. The castle began as a tower house in the 16thcentury and was expanded by Halliday. The castle underwent further reconstruction in the 18thcentury, and changed ownership to the Moncrieff family around 1740. In 1790, due to financial difficulties, the roof of the castle was removed and sold to the owner of Glendevon Castle, but by the turn of the century the castle was reroofed. The castle was renovated in the mid 20thcentury and some of the Victorian elements were removed for older features. In 1662, ten women and one man were executed near Tullibole Castle for witchcraft; the laird at the time was William Halliday. He and his son John, along with several prominent locals from Crook and Devon, formed a tribunal and set out to prove the evidence of witchcraft. They unfortunately tortured people to receive confessions and used these confessions at the official trials. Eleven people were found guilty of witchcraft and hanged. In 2012, Rhoderick Moncrieff unveiled a memorial at the castle to commemorate the witch trials that his 17thcentury predecessor ordered. The half-ton sandstone pillar has the names of the victims etched on it and stands in the center of the 100-foot hedge maze. Currently, Rhoderick and his wife Allison run a bed and breakfast out of the castle. The castle grounds boast a 9thcentury ruined medieval church, an ancient graveyard, a carriage house, gardens, a maze, a moat, fish ponds, lots of wandering peacocks, and a ruined 18thcentury Doocot, which was used to house pigeons. Tullibole Castle serves as a wedding and corporate venue. 

Thornbury Castle

Thornbury Castle is located in Thornbury in South Gloucestershire, England. Constructed upon the site of an earlier 10thcentury manor home, Thornbury Castle was built in 1511 for Edward Stafford, the 3rdDuke of Buckingham. Built as a country home, the castle has a symmetrical entrance with octagonal towers and impressive chimney detail and brickwork. The property boasts a gatehouse, walled gardens, and a GWR Castle class 4-6-0 locomotive. The interior has a dungeon dining room, grand halls, private dining rooms, open fireplaces, and lavish bedchambers. Edward Stafford was a distant cousin of King Henry VIII. Stafford was betrayed by a disgruntled servant and accused of treason so the king had him beheaded. After his death, the king confiscated Thornbury Castle and stayed there for a ten-day honeymoon in 1535 with his queen, Anne Boleyn. The castle remained a royal property until the death of Mary I, it was then returned to the duke’s descendants. The castle fell into ruin after the English Civil War and was later renovated by the Howard family in the 1850’s. Between 1966 and 1986 the castle operated one of the United Kingdom’s top restaurants. Thornbury Castle currently serves as a 28-room luxury hotel and restaurant. The castle hotel offers spa treatments, fine dining, archery, croquet, and tennis. 

Glengorm Castle

Glengorm Castle is located on the Isle of Mull in Scotland. The 19thcentury Scottish Baronial home was built for James Forsyth of Quinish. Forsyth was not beloved on the island as he bullied crofters in the area, evicting the tenants and burning their cottages. He was even told by an older woman that he would never live in the castle he was building, and he didn’t, Forsyth was killed in a riding accident just before the castle was completed in 1863. His son inherited the property. Forsyth also asked an elderly woman what he should name his castle and she told him “Glengorm” to which he agreed, not knowing that in Gaelic Glengorm meant blue glen, a reference to the blue smoke that filled the air when Forsyth had the thatched roof cottages burned down. Set amongst forests, lochs, and hills, Glengorm Castle boasts five luxury suites, grand receptions rooms, a secret stairway, a game room, a whisky lounge, a library, and more. The castle is currently owned by the Nelson family and serves as a Bed and Breakfast and offers self-catering accommodations with rooms available inside the castle or in one of the six cottages scattered about the property. The castle has a café and shop and offers fishing, scenic trails, guided nature walks, Atlantic Ocean views, and complimentary whiskeys from around the world.