Category: palaces

Linlithgow Palace is located in the town of Linlithgow in West Lothian, Scotland. The palace is situated on a low hill above a small inland loch. The site has been occupied since Roman times, and has served as a royal residence since the reign of David I in 1124-53. In 1424, due to an English attack, fire damaged the earlier residence. James I ordered the new construction of a quadrangular palace with a central courtyard. The palace was added to throughout its history. The palace served as a nursery for James V, Mary Queen of Scots, and Princess Elizabeth. The royal apartments were added by James IV, the three-tier courtyard fountain was added by James V, and the north quarter was rebuilt for James VI. In 1603, James VI moved the royal court to London after his coronation as James I of England. In 1607, the queen’s apartment fell to the ground, but it was rebuilt around 1620. In 1746, the palace was used by government troops under the Duke of Cumberland who were pursuing Prince Charles, when the troops left they set the palace on fire. The palace remains roofless and some of the upper floors are missing, the ground floor, first floor buildings and some of the corner towers are accessible. The courtyard fountain was completely rebuilt and restored in 2005, although 2/3 of it was replaced. Linlithgow Palace is open to the public. (temporarily closed right now)  Photo credit: Nichbrand

Beylerbeyi Palace is located in Istanbul, Turkey. The neo-Baroque palace was built in the 1860s and served as the summer residence of the Ottoman sultans. The three-story, rectangular palace is located on the banks of the Bosphorus strait. The palace was used to host visiting dignitaries and boasts twenty-four rooms, six halls, and a Turkish bath. The palace is divided into men and women sections with separate entrances and two separate bathing pavilions. The exterior is made of white marble and stone, while the interior has brick walls, wood floors, and decorative columns. The flooring is covered with Egyptian rush matting, which fights against humidity in the winter and heat in the summer, and then covered with carpets. The palace is lavishly decorated and has a twisting central staircase, Bohemian crystal chandeliers, Hereke carpets, French clocks, porcelain vases, and a grand reception hall that has an oval pool and a fountain. While the receiving rooms are decorated in an opulent manner, the harem was simply decorated. The property boasts gardens, two small sea kiosks, an old tunnel, terraces, and a stable with painted horses on the ceiling and a fountain pool. Beylerbeyi Palace is open to the public, but photography is not permitted inside the palace.

Dolmabahçe Palace is located in Istanbul, Turkey. The palace served as the administrative center for the late Ottoman Empire and was built in the 19thcentury to replace an earlier wooden structure upon the orders of 31stSultan, Abdulmecid I, who wished to have a modern-day palace. The palace was very costly to build and the expense put a financial burden on the Ottoman Empire, which eventually defaulted on its public debt. The palace was home to six sultans until the abolition of the Caliphate in 1924. Dolmabahçe Palace is under the ownership of the National Heritage of the New Turkish Republic. Turkey’s first president used the palace during the summer months. Dolmabahçe Palace is the largest palace in Turkey and boasts 285 rooms, 46 halls, and 6 baths on 11 acres. With traditional Ottoman architecture, the palace has eclectic, Baroque, Rococo, and Neoclassical elements, and is lavishly decorated with gold and crystal. The interior features separate wings, with the southern wing reserved for men and the northern wing reserved for the Sultan and his family. The harem area has eight interconnected apartments that were isolated from the outside world. The world’s largest Bohemian crystal chandelier is located in the Ceremonial Hall. The interior has a double shaped horseshoe stairway, Hereke carpets, a bearskin rug that was a gift from Tsar Nicholas I, and over two hundred oil paintings. Dolmabahçe Palace is open to the public. 

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Goetz Palace is located in Brzesko, Poland. The 19thcentury palace was built by the Goetz family, owners of Okocim brewery, one of the most popular beer markers in Poland. With the Nazi invasion, the palace and the brewery were taken over and nationalized by the communists, but they were later reprivatized and sold back to the Goetz family descendants in 2007. In 2008, the property was purchased by a couple who planned to transform the palace into a five-star hotel and spa, which would include the opportunity to bathe in beer produced by the brewery. Trying to find information and history on this castle was difficult. I’m unsure if it ever became a hotel, but the palace does serve as a wedding venue and the pictures are beautiful. 

Eltham Palace is located in London, England. The medieval, Tudor palace was first mentioned in the 11thcentury and was owned by Odo, Bishop of Bayeaux. The property exchanged hands numerous times, and in 1295, Anthony Bek, Bishop of Durham, owned the property. Bek rebuilt the manor house and had a defensive wall built within the line of the moat. In the 14thcentury, Edward II granted the manor to Queen Isabella and the castle became a royal residence. Extensive renovations occurred during this time, which included a new drawbridge and new royal lodgings. In the 1380’s, King Richard II added a dancing chamber and new bathhouse. King Edward IV added the great hall, while King Henry VIII built new royal lodgings, a chapel, and created a tiltyard for jousting on the property in 1517. By the 17thcentury, the property was poorly maintained and fell into decay so the castle was sold to Colonial Nathaniel Rich. Rich had many of the buildings torn down. Eltham Palace was used for tenant farmers for a couple of centuries. The current palace was built in the 1930’s by the Courtauld family, who leased the property from the Crown for 99-years. The new manor incorporates King Edward II’s great hall with its hammer beam roof, but the new interior is decorated in an Art Deco style. In 1940, the great hall roof was badly damaged by German bombs and the Courtauld family moved to Scotland, leaving the property to the Royal Army Educational Corps in 1945. The Corps remained until 1992, when the English Heritage group assumed the palace’s management. The charity group renovated and restored the interiors and exteriors. Eltham Palace is open to the public and serves as a wedding venue. 

Hampstead Court Palace is located in Dinmore, England. The royal palace was built in the 16thcentury for Cardinal Thomas Wosley. Wosley fell out of favor with King Henry VIII when he failed to secure the king’s divorce from Catherine of Aragon and so he gifted the palace to the king. In an effort to be able to assemble the one thousand members of his court, King Henry VIII enlarged the castle and built a huge kitchen, the tennis courts, and the Great Hall with its hammer-beamed ceiling. In the 17thcentury, the castle was enlarged again by King William III, who wanted the palace to rival the Palace of Versailles. King George II was the last monarch to reside at Hampstead Court Palace. The Great Hall was destroyed in 1838 during the reign of Queen Victoria and then restored. During Victoria’s reign, some elements of the castle were reduced in size while others were eliminated. The lead cupolas that once graced the top of four towers were removed. The palace’s royal occupants carry long, fascinating histories. Edward VI was born there, Jane Seymour died there, Catherine Howard was confined there, Queen Mary I spent her honeymoon there, and King James met English Puritans there. The palace is designed in the Tudor and Baroque styles and houses a Royal Collection of art, a garden maze, the Fountain Court, and historic royal tennis courts. There are ten statues of heraldic animals that are called the Kings Beast that stand on the bridge over the moat, which leads to the gatehouse. The interior boasts staterooms, private royal apartments, the Great Hall, and a chapel renovated by Queen Anne. Hampstead Court Palace is owned by the Crown and is open to the public. #Castles #Palaces #RoyalPalace #England #HampsteadCourtPalace #HampsteadCourt #Dinmore

Holyrood Palace is located in Edinburgh, Scotland. Built in the 17thcentury, the royal palace has a quadrangle design that is three stories tall in some areas and two stories in others. The palace sits on ten acres and has been extended and renovated several times. The palace has Doric columns and an octagonal cupola with a clock. The ruins of an abbey church connect to the palace on the northeast corner. The colonnaded piazza has nine arches, and pilasters. Classical orders of architecture were used in designing the palace with the Ionic order used in the state apartments and the Doric order used for the ground floor. Some of the areas in the palace are open to the public; except when the royal family is in residence. Queen Elizabeth usually spends a week at the palace every summer. The palace served as the main residence for the King and Queens of Scotland since the 16thcentury. The palace has a long history and still remains a site for state occasions and official entertaining. Holyrood Palace boasts plaster angels holding the Honors of Scotland, 16thcentury frescoes, the King’s apartments, the Great Gallery with portraits displaying the Scottish monarchs, and much more. The 16thcentury garden has a sundial, a fountain, and a garden building known as Queen Mary’s Bath House, although it wasn’t used for bathing. The palace is the property of the Crown but is maintained by Scottish Ministers.

castlesandmedievals:

Palais Garnier

castlesandmedievals:

Palais Garnier

castlesandmedievals:

The Palais Garnier (pronounced: [palɛ ɡaʁnje] French (help·info)) is a 1,979-seatopera house, which was built from 1861 to 1875 for the Paris Opera. It was originally called the Salle des Capucines, because of its location on the Boulevard des Capucines in the 9th arrondissement of Paris, but soon became known as the Palais Garnier, in recognition of its opulence and its architect, Charles Garnier. The theatre is also often referred to as the Opéra Garnier (French (help·info)) and historically was known as the Opéra de Paris or simply the Opéra,[7] as it was the primary home of the Paris Opera and its associated Paris Opera Ballet until 1989, when the Opéra Bastille opened at the Place de la Bastille.[8] The Paris Opera now mainly uses the Palais Garnier for ballet.