Category: hotel

Barony Castle

Barony Castle Hotel is located in Eddleston, in the Scottish Borders area of Scotland. The castle is also known as the Black Barony, Blackbarony, and Darnhall. A tower house was built upon this site in the early 15thcentury when John Murray, Laird of Blackbarony was granted the estate and his title by King James IV. After his death, his son Andrew inherited the estate and title. Andrew had the Scottish baronial style castle built on the site of the old tower house. The castle’s French (Jacobean) façade was added in the 18thcentury. By the 19thcentury, plans were drawn up to for a new mansion, but it was never built. Instead the castle was repaired and altered around 1847. A north section was added in 1855 to add more bedrooms, and the house was further enlarged in 1887. The property passed to the Murrays of Elibank in 1771, who held ownership until 1926. The castle was converted into a hotel at that time and a ballroom was added in 1933. The castle served as a station for Polish soldiers until the end of WWII. Thereafter it returned to a hotel under the new ownership of Polish war veteran, Jan Tomasik. Tomasik had the three-dimension, outdoor concrete scale model of Scotland added to the property. The Mercure Group, part of Accor Hotels, currently operates the hotel. Barony Castle is three stories tall with four-story square towers set on 25 acres of mature gardens and woodlands. The grounds boast 19thcentury stables, an 18thcentury icehouse, and a Yew Tree walk. The hotel has 78 bedrooms, 14 meeting rooms, a restaurant and bar, and a health and fitness suite with an indoor pool, sauna, spa, and gymnasium. 

Dalmunzie Castle

Dalmunzie Castle is located in County Perthshire in Blairgowrie, Scotland. The 16thcentury castle was built in the Scottish Baronial style and sits on a 6500-acre estate. The turreted castle is surrounded by mountains, glens, rivers, and its own golf course. The castle serves as a hotel with 20 unique themed rooms named after influential clans in Dalmunzie’s history over the last 500 years. During the period of 1782-1813 the MacKintosh family had financial difficulties and the castle fell into ruin. An L-shaped hunting lodge was built on the site in 1874, a larger lodge was built in 1884, and a Victorian wing was added in the 1890’s. The Gaelic language had been used in the Glenshee area for thousands of years, but disappeared during the late 19thcentury. After 350 years of ownership, the castle was purchased in 1920 by Sir Archibald Birkmyre. Birkmyre built a new driveway, Britain’s highest golf course, and a 2.5-mile railway to Glenlochsie Lodge. He also extended the main house by adding an Edwardian wing, the oak tower, and expanded the stables and staff cottages. Dalmunzie was used as a base during WWII. Dirkmyre sold the estate to a decorated WWII fighter pilot known as DW. DW transformed the castle into a country house hotel. The railway was removed in the 1970’s and the hotel was sold to the Campbell family in 1980. In 1987, the castle sold again, and in 2013 Roger Aston refurbished the castle into the hotel it is today. 

Broomhall Castle

Broomhall Castle is located in the county of Clackmannanshire in Menstrie village, Scotland. The Baronial castle was built in 1874 for James Johnstone. The three-story castle has a tower and was used as Johnstone’s private residence until his businesses fell into decline. The castle was sold to the Italian Riding School in 1906. In 1910, the Castle was sold to the Clifford Park Boys Prep School, with 10 boarders. The castle suffered through fire in 1941. The roof fell in and the building was gutted. Thankfully the German Schoolmaster had taken the boys out of the castle for a midnight feast when the fire occurred. Unfortunately, the fire allowed German planes to bomb the Clyde shipyards, and to safely fly away across the Ochil Hills. I’m unsure if this attack was planned in part by the German Schoolmaster, but it definitely sounds like a possibility. Broomhall Castle became a ruin until 1985 when it was rebuilt into a nursing home. In 2003, the castle was converted into a hotel with 16 en-suite bedrooms, a restaurant, and a lounge. 

Cabra Castle

Cabra Castle is located in County Cavan, Ireland. The 19thcentury castle’s exterior was built in a neo Norman style, while the interior carries a Gothic design. The castle was built by the Foster family, who unfortunately went bankrupt due to the castle’s construction costs. In 1813, the castle was sold to the wealthy Pratt family, who owned substantial holdings in the area. They renamed Comey Castle to Cabra Castle in 1820. The castle estate remained with the Pratt family until 1964, when it was sold to the Brennan family. It was the Brennan family who transformed the castle into a hotel. The hotel was closed when the castle estate was sold again in 1986 to Mr. Mansour. In 1991, the castle was sold to the Corscadden family. The Corscadden’s restored the castle and reopened it as a four-star luxury hotel. The castle estate boasts one hundred acres of parkland and gardens, with an on-site 9-hole golf course, tennis, a gate lodge, and six cottages. Cabra Castle has 105 bedrooms, a bar, a restaurant, and conference rooms. 

Knock Castle

Knock Castle is located in the town of Crieff in Perthshire, Scotland. Built in 1885 for Glasgow merchant, William Miller, and then purchased by Scottish shipping magnates Lord and Lady MacBrayne, this Baronial home was constructed amid the hills of the Strathearn Valley. Knock Castle has become a four-star hotel and boasts 20 bedrooms with ensuite bathrooms, a spa, two restaurants, a whiskey bar, a 12-seat theater, a steam room, sauna room, a gym complex, a lodge, and a swimming pool built inside the conservatory that is known for its spectacular views. The castle sits on 3.5 acres overlooking the town of Crieff. 

Crossbasket Castle

Crossbasket Castle is located in Glasgow, Scotland. The
first tower was erected on this site in the early 15th century and
served as the dower-house of the Lindsay’s of Dunrod. Robert the Bruce granted
John Lindsay the lands of Kilbride in 1382, and the lands remained a part of
his family’s holdings until the 17th century. The property changed
hands numerous times throughout its history. In 1878, the inventor and
manufacturer of a waterproof material used for raincoats, Charles Macintosh,
lived at the castle and had a dye mill constructed on the property near the
River Calder. The castle was sold to the Clark Family and eventually came under
ownership of George Neilson in 1891. It was Neilson who created the castle that
is seen today. The castle continued to change ownership and in the 1960’s, the
castle served as an education center called James Little College. In 1981, the
Castle was sold to the Latter Rain Ministries and ran as a Christian center
until 2005. The castle was then sold to a developer, but the property remained
in an abandoned state until 2011. Crossbasket Castle was purchased by the
Reid-Timoney family who spent millions to transforms the castle into a luxury
hotel and event venue. Crossbasket Castle boasts nine bedrooms, a Gate Lodge, a
ballroom, a four-story private bridal tower, opulent public rooms, a tearoom, and
an award-winning restaurant.  #Hotel
#Glasgow #Scotland #Castles #Restaurant #History