Category: Château

Château de Vincennes, Avenue de Paris, 94300 V…

Château de Vincennes,
Avenue de Paris, 94300 Vincennes, Val-de-Marne, France.

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The Château de Vincennes is a massive 14th and 17th century French royal castle now a suburb of the metropolis. This donjon, 52 meters high, was the tallest medieval fortified structure of Europe.

Château Sully-sur-Loire, Sully-sur-Loire, Loir…

Château Sully-sur-Loire,
Sully-sur-Loire, Loiret, France.

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The Château de Sully-sur-Loire is a château-fort, a true castle, built to control one of the few sites where the Loire can be forded. It has been converted to a palatial seigneurial residence.

The Château was the seat of the ducs de Sully. In 1716 and again in 1719 the château offered refuge to Voltaire after he had been exiled from Paris for affronting the Régent, Philippe, duc d’Orléans.

The Château remained in the possession of the de Sully family until 1962 when it became the property of the Département du Loiret. The Château de Sully-sur-Loire is listed as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture.

Château de Sully-sur-Loire,  Sully-sur-Loire, …

Château de Sully-sur-Loire,  
Sully-sur-Loire, Loiret, France.

www.castlesandmanorhouses.com

The Château de Sully-sur-Loire was built as a château-fort, a true castle, built to control one of the few sites where the Loire can be forded. It has been converted to a palatial seigneurial residence.

The Château was the seat of the ducs de Sully. In 1716 and again in 1719 the château offered refuge to Voltaire after he had been exiled from Paris for affronting the Régent, Philippe, Duc d’Orléans.

The Château remained in the possession of the de Sully family until 1962 when it became the property of the Département du Loiret. The Château de Sully-sur-Loire is listed as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture.

Château de Chenonceau, Chenonceau, Indre-et-Lo…

Château de Chenonceau,
Chenonceau, Indre-et-Loire, France.

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The estate of Chenonceau is first mentioned in writing in the 11th century. The current château was built in 1514–1522 on the foundations of an old mill and was later extended to span the river. The bridge over the river was built (1556-1559) and the gallery on the bridge (1570–1576). The château has been classified as a Monument historique since 1840 by the French Ministry of Culture. It is one of the most famous Loire Valley châteaux.

Château de Chillon, Veytaux, Montreux, Switzer…

Château de Chillon,
Veytaux, Montreux, Switzerland.

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The Château de Chillon (Chillon Castle) is an island castle located on the shore of Lake Geneva at the eastern end of the lake. The first written record of the castle date to 1160.

From the mid 12th century, the castle was home to the Counts of Savoy.

The Château de Chillon was made popular by Lord Byron, who wrote the poem The Prisoner Of Chillon; Byron also carved his name on a pillar of the dungeon.

The castle is also one of the settings in Henry James’s novella Daisy Miller (1878).

Château de Vitré, Vitré, Ille-et-Vilaine, Fran…

Château de Vitré,
Vitré, Ille-et-Vilaine, France.

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The first stone castle here was built by the baron Robert I of Vitré at the end of the 11th century. The defensive site chosen, a rocky promontory, dominated the valley of the Vilaine. A Romanesque style doorway still survives from this building. During the first half of the 13th century, baron André III, rebuilt it in its present triangular form, following the contours of the rocks, surrounded with dry moats.

The castle was bought by the town in the 1820 for 8500 francs. In 1872, it was one of the first castles in France to be classified as a monument historique (historic monument). It was restored from 1875.

Château Solvay, also called the Château de La …

Château Solvay, also called the Château de La Hulpe,
La Hulpe, Walloon Brabant, Belgium.

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The château was built by the Marquis de Béthune in the French style in 1842. In the late 19th century, the house and estate were acquired by Ernest Solvay, and have since been known as the Domaine Solvay. Today the property is owned by the regional government of Wallonia, and is classified as an “Exceptional Heritage Site in Wallonia.” The grounds are open to the public.

Château de Suscinio (or de Susinio), Sarzeau, …

Château de Suscinio (or de Susinio),
Sarzeau, Morbihan, Brittany, France.

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The Château de Suscinio was built in the late Middle Ages as the residence of the Dukes of Brittany. It dates from the beginning of the 13th century. It was enlarged at the end of 14th century, when the heirs of the duchy were fighting to keep their possessions (Brittany was not annexed by France until 1514).

From 1471 to 1483, the castle was home to Jasper Tudor, Henry Tudor (later King Henry VII of England), and the core of their group of exiled Lancastrians, numbering about 500 by 1483. Duke Francis II supported this group of exiles against Plantagenet demands for their surrender.

Château Frontenac, 1 Rue Des Carrières, Québec…

Château Frontenac,
1 Rue Des Carrières, Québec QC G1R 4P5, Canada.

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The Château Frontenac is one of Canada’s grand railway hotels dating from the late 19th / early 20th centuries. The World War II Allies’ Quebec Conferences of 1943 and 1944 were held here. In 1953, it was used as a location for Alfred Hitchcock’s film I Confess. It was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1980. The site was previously occupied by the Château Haldimand, residence of the British colonial governors of Lower Canada and Quebec.

Château de Beynac, Beynac-et-Cazenac, Dordogne…

Château de Beynac,
Beynac-et-Cazenac, Dordogne, France.

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The castle is one of the best-preserved and best known in the Dordogne, perched on top of a limestone cliff, dominating the town and the north bank of the Dordogne River.

The castle was built in the 12th century by the barons of Beynac (one of the four baronies of Périgord) to control the valley of the Dordogne River.

The sheer cliff face was sufficient to discourage any assault from that side, so the defences were concentrated on the plateau on the other side. They included double crenellated walls, double moats,and a double barbican.